RSS

Worlding in futures

I write from nipaluna, Hobart in lutruwita Tasmania, Australia. I overlook timtumili minanya, River Derwent from a land as ancient as the skies. I tell stories that tap into futures informed by the oldest continuing and living cultures imaginable. My worlding draws on connection to place, space and time. The stories I tell conjure oral histories and told cultures whose murmurings hover in lived memory. They shadow the written word and illuminate precious knowledge. I shine light on caves of understanding that are as old as the sun. I hurl my knowledge spears on and through and into 2050. I embrace past, present and future.  My spears sense bright futures with high standards of caring for Country and ourselves. My spears sense hearts bursting with curiosity, cultural pride and deep joy. My spears sense reformed communities, connected in peace. I launch in hope.

Sarah Jane Moore, June 2020

 

Posted by on July 2, 2020 in Uncategorized

Leave a comment

Australia Council CREATE Funding recipient Sarah Jane Moore

Worlding with Oysters

On June 16 it was announced that I have been awarded a Create Australia Council Grant to support my visual art practise.  I am thrilled to announce this and look forward to sharing my practise as the year progresses.

Why Sydney Rock Oysters?

Since working in the Science Faculty at UNSW Sydney in 2017, my professional art practice has nestled into the nexus between art and science, with a focus on the oyster. In 2018, I met UNSW Indigenous Scientia Fellow Dr Laura Parker (Wiradjuri) when she presented her dynamic research that mapped the ways in which oysters struggle to adjust to climate change. Meeting her and listening to the dire projections about the plight of Sydney’s oysters inspired me to shift my artistic practise to embrace arts activism, science communication and art works for change. In 2019, I secured the Australian Network Art Technology (ANAT) Synapse Artist in Residency funding and spent the year as the oyster artist in residence in Biological Earth and Environmental Science at UNSW. The residency culminated in academic publications, a community reef-building event; songs, poetry, lectures, workshops, a keynote for the Biosciences Education Australia Network Conference at the University of Melbourne; an exhibition at Culture at Work Art/Science Research Hub in Pyrmont and a commissioned performance at the University of Sydney for prominent oyster researcher Professor Pauline Ross.

What has been your experience of lock down?

To work professionally as an artist is sometimes a precarious place. It means sporadic income, applying for grants, hoping to sell art works from yearly exhibitions and relying on the good will of clients to invest in buying visual work, attend workshops and support the centrality of the creative arts in our daily worlding. In February I relocated to lutruwita Tasmania to care for family and lost most of my income, access to materials, gallery supports and buyer networks.

What next?

In 2020 my creative research dialogues continue to be supported by UNSW through an Adjunct Associate Lecturer role. This provides access to a lab/studio space and guidance from the UNSW Centre for Marine Science and Innovation alongside vital exposure to observe experiments that test the impacts of climate change and environmental stress on marine life.

In August I begin recording the three songs that I have written in lock down. They explore my Worlding with Oysters theme as I begin to prepare for my multi disciplinary exhibition in October 2020.

Anton Rehrl of Corvid Photography will continue to be working with me on digital outreach and I will be recording in Margate at Reel to Reel Studios for the first time and Oliver Gathercole will accompany me on the grand piano. Local photographer Nigel Richardson has agreed to photograph the experience and so watch this space for more images.

Please reach out, view my work, share an oyster story and create a connection.

I can be can be contacted at sarahjane.moore@unsw.edu.au and my blog is http://moore2019.blog.anat.org.au/

Digitised galleries of my work can be viewed through the following links:

https://corvid.smugmug.com/Client-Gallery/2019/Sarah-Jane-Exhibition-pieces/n-cXq3XX/

 

https://corvid.smugmug.com/Client-Gallery/2019/Sarah-Jane-Moores-Sydney-Rock-Oyster-Community-Reef-Building/n-mztnGG

 

https://onedrive.live.com/embed?cid=10852D736983F278&resid=10852D736983F278%214695&authkey=ABAmkvwDqYHInvE

 

 

Posted by on June 28, 2020 in Uncategorized

Leave a comment

Imagining Futures with Yulia Nesterova

Yulia Nesterova and I began conceptualising work together after spending time together in Sydney Australia in November 2019. Despite some post covid set backs in negotiating face to face projects that workshop, make and play, Yulia and I were successful in being selected to write a back ground paper for UNESCO that imagines futures.

I write from nipaluna, Hobart in lutruwita Tasmania, Australia. I overlook timtumili minanya, River Derwent from a land as ancient as the skies. I tell stories that tap into futures informed by the oldest continuing and living cultures imaginable. My worlding draws on connection to place, space and time. The stories I tell conjure oral histories and told cultures whose murmurings hover in lived memory. They shadow the written word and illuminate precious knowledge. I hurl my knowledge spears on and through and into 2050. I embrace past, present and future.  I launch in hope. I shine a light on caves of understanding that are as old as the sun. My spears sense bright futures with high standards of caring for Country and ourselves. My spears sense hearts bursting with curiosity, cultural pride and deep joy. My spears sense reformed communities, connected in peace.

Sarah Jane Moore, June 2020

Writing in partnership across the miles from lutruwita Tasmania to Glasgow with 17500 odd kilometres between us, Yulia and I have carved out time to imagine a future, together. As she sleeps, I wake. Each day/night grows the conversation. Indigenous approaches are driven by a deep commitment to nurture land and avoid unnecessary planetary travel and movements and so we have paid particular attention to our sharing and learning across the digital space. We have forged deep, creative and imaginative connections that have secured a local, global and democratic path and process towards imagining our future.

We have been worlding together and it has been delicious.

You world

I listen.

You write

I weave.

You sleep

I walk.

You dream

I gather.

I lean on the ancient, breathe salt and chew seaweed.

I sing to you. 

Out loud.

With love; SJ.

 

Posted by on June 28, 2020 in Uncategorized

Leave a comment

Look Away

 

Posted by on June 27, 2020 in Uncategorized

Leave a comment

I know where oysters lie

 

Posted by on June 27, 2020 in Uncategorized

Leave a comment

Mountain Story

 

 

Posted by on June 27, 2020 in Uncategorized

Leave a comment

Rock pools glisten; earth tides listen

‘Rock pools glisten; earth tides listen’, 35 cm x 45cm, 2019

Shells, clay, bark, feathers, stones and lichen on board

This work is entitled ‘Rock pools glisten; earth tides listen’ and was exhibited in my November 2019 show at the Accelerator Gallery through Culture at Work. It uses the ground Baludarri (Sydney Rock Oyster) shells that Wiradjuri Scientist Laura Parker seeded and studied in her research. Embedded in clay and using the gifted coquina shells Professor of Marine Sciences Pieter Visscher harvested in Western Australia. The coquinas are a critical part of the coastal ecosystem that keeps Shark Bay alive. When living, they are well adapted to the high salinity of the waters, when dead, they stabilize the shoreline of Gutharraguda, as Shark Bay’s name is in the language of the first peoples there. The work also includes lichen, bark and ground leaf matter and remembers the coastal pools that I peered into as a child on the East Coast of Tasmania and includes remnants of my mother’s crochet; her last acts of creativity before succumbing to cancer 30 years ago. Framed in flight by the single white cockatoo feather, it links gift, memory, loss and disruption with connection, interrelativity and oyster worlding.

Photo credit; Anton Rehrl of Corvid Photography.

This work is 35cm x 45 cm and for sale for $700 inclusive of postage.

Please contact sarahjanemoore@unsw.edu.au for all sales. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by on April 5, 2020 in Uncategorized

Leave a comment

I know where Oysters Lie; Accelerator Gallery Pyrmont

 

Posted by on November 21, 2019 in Uncategorized

Leave a comment

I know where oysters lie exhibition; Accelerator Gallery Pyrmont

 

Posted by on November 21, 2019 in Uncategorized

Leave a comment

I know where oysters lie ; the Accelerator Gallery, Pyrmont November 9-16 2019

 

Posted by on November 15, 2019 in Uncategorized

Leave a comment